Safe and Inclusive Field Schools

Safe and Inclusive Field Schools

The Southern Illinois University Edwardsville STEM Center, in collaboration with the Arkansas Archeological Survey and Mississippi State University, are in the first phase of a three phase project to investigate policies and procedures that help support safe and inclusive archaeological field schools in the southeastern United States. Funded by the National Science Foundation (Award No. 1937392), the first phase of the project will include conducting a survey of archaeological field school directors to understand current practices implemented by directors to prevent sexual harassment and assault. The research team will be conducting this research among field directors who offered a field school in 2018 and/or 2019 and/or will be offering a field school in 2020 or 2021. 

 

If you have or are conducting a field school that is associated with college credit and is held in the southeastern United States (broadly defined as Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia) and would like to contribute to our research, please complete this google form.

For more information about the project, please contact our research team at safefieldschools@gmail.com. More information about the project will be posted as we conduct the initial stages of this important research.

Project Rationale 

Researchers have recognized the positive learning outcomes that students achieve when they have the opportunity to participate in field-based research. Through such activities, students show increases in their motivation to learn and perceptions of their abilities to succeed in their field of study. Field-based learning also helps students achieve cognitive and metacognitive gains and competencies that move them from a novice to an expert understanding.

In the United States, field-based undergraduate training has long been a primary educational component for students pursuing a bachelor’s degree in anthropology specializing in archaeology. Undergraduate students who aspire to be an archaeologist must enroll in a field school, an immersive field course where students learn archaeological field methods.

Although many researchers have noted the positive gains that undergraduate students experience from field-based research, recent studies demonstrate that field research can come with negative consequences. In archaeology, a recent study documented high rates of sexual harassment and assault among those conducting field research: 66% and 13% of respondents to a recent survey administered to archaeologists conducting research in the southeastern United States reported sexual harassment and assault respectively (Meyers et al., 2018). Although not exclusive to field school students, these numbers, and others, suggest that sexual harassment and assault is common and student trainees are frequently subjected to such treatment. 

The primary aim of this research project is to document and determine the practices and procedures that promote harassment and assault free environments for undergraduate students at archaeological field schools. Through this research, we aim to address the following research questions:

1) Is there a set of practices and procedures commonly implemented by field directors with potential to create a field school that is free of sexual harassment, assault, and violence? 

2) What set of policies and procedures is most frequently implemented among field schools and are these policies and procedures perceived as effective? 

3) Do additional policies and procedures emerge among field schools as effective?

4) How can these policies and procedures be broadly implemented to increase field school safety and inclusion among diverse field schools?

Project Personnel

Dr. Carol E. Colaninno (ccolani@siue.edu), research assistant professor at the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (SIUE) Center for STEM Research, Education, & Outreach serves as PI on this project. Colaninno is a registered professional archaeologist and STEM education researcher who has overseen multiple federal, state, and private grants funding research and outreach in archaeology and STEM education. Throughout her career, Colaninno has placed an emphasis on providing and understanding opportunities for women to persist in archaeology and STEM.

Dr. Emily Beahm (beahm@uark.edu) is a research station archeologist with the Arkansas Archeological Survey, University of Arkansas – Winthrop Rockefeller Institute Station. For several years, Beahm helped design and supervise an archaeological field school through Middle Tennessee State University. Beahm has experience evaluating curriculum efficacy and implementing action research through her annual educational archaeology program “Project Dig”. She has experience designing educational research instruments including surveys, reflective discussions, material analysis, and teacher evaluations to gauge students’ understanding of culture and archaeological processes. Beahm also serves as the newsletter associate editor for SEAC. 

Dr. Carl Drexler (cdrexler@uark.edu) is a research assistant professor with the University of Arkansas and a station archeologist with the Arkansas Archeological Survey – Southern Arkansas University research station. He has been involved with a number of field schools in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic, supporting field school education and instructional design. His work with descendant communities and heritage groups, focusing on conflict sites, leverages his skills in ethnographic interviewing and oral history collection.

Dr. Shawn Lambert (Shawn.Lambert@anthro.msstate.edu) is an assistant professor at Mississippi State University and a research fellow at the Cobb Institute of Archaeology, a research unit at Mississippi State University. Prior to his appointment at Mississippi State, Lambert served as Utah’s state public archaeologist. His responsibilities included public outreach, education, curriculum development, and public excavations. Lambert also served as the tribal liaison for Utah’s eight sovereign Native American nations. He currently serves on the SEAC Sexual Harassment and Assault Task Force. 

Ms. Morgan Tallman (mtallma@siue.edu) is a graduate research assistant with the SIUE STEM Center and will be assisting with the initial phases of the research. Morgan is pursuing her master’s degree in clinical psychology. She has worked with the SIUE STEM Center for over a year coordinating with STEM Center faculty to help produce outreach content.